Today, we’re going to be looking at another meal replacement product that is on the market – Isagenix. The name is pretty well known, and you may have heard of Isagenix before now. Isagenix is a nutritional cleanse and health products company that sells meal replacement bars, shakes and more.

The program is designed primarily as a cleanse. A cleanse is probably not the best idea for a long-term weight loss plan, but it can certainly be useful in the short term. Of course, with any weight loss program, there is more here than meets the eye. Whether that is a positive or negative thing remains to be seen during this review.

isagenixIsagenix Overview

Isagenix is a selection of mostly natural nutrition products. They have been in business since around 2005, and there have been some success stories according to the official website. The product seems to be backed up by actual clinical research, although the text on the website is rather misleading because if you actually read the research in question you will find that a generic liquid meal replacement was used, not Isagenix specifically. However, the website leads you to believe that it was Isagenix that was responsible for the weight loss in the clinical trial.

Isagenix isn’t just a weight loss and supplement company. They use a MLM marketing model, meaning that they try to encourage people to sell the product and create a down line, paying them money whenever someone in their down line sells something. But despite the questionable business model and the misleading research, the real question is whether or not these products work to help you lose weight.

There is no question that people have had success on the Isagenix diet. Like Weight Watchers, you replace two meals a day with shakes. You end up with around 1200 calories per day, which is lower than your doctor would tell you to make your calorie deficit, because it’s just not healthy to eat so few calories. Plus, your body goes into starvation mode and won’t burn fat anyway.

Company Information

Let’s take a look at the company behind Isagenix. The company was founded by John Anderson, someone quite well known in the supplement world. The company scores an A+ on the Better Business Bureau rating card, which is a very high rating and quite impressive.

Ingredients

  • Whey Protein Concentrate
  • Milk Protein Concentrate
  • Low-heat nonfat dry milk
  • Isomaltooligosaccharide powder,
  • Fructose
  • Sunflower Oil Powder
  • Natural Flavors
  • Olive oil powder
  • Flax Seed Powder Xanthan Gum
  • Tapioca Maltodextrin
  • Medium Chain Triglyceride
  • Oil Powder
  • Cinnamon Powder
  • Ionic Alfalfa
  • Magnesium Oxide
  • Tricalcium Phosphate
  • Potassium Citrate
  • Magnesium Citrate
  • Apple Juice Powder
  • Sea Salt
  • Enzyme Blend
  • Cellulase Invertase
  • Protease Amylase
  • Bromelain
  • Papain
  • Acid Stable Protease
  • Silicon Dioxide
  • Yucca
  • Vitamin C Magnesium Stearate
  • Psyllium Seed Powder
  • Biotin
  • Selenium Amino Acid Chelate
  • Lactobacillus Acidophilus
  • Vitamin E Succinate
  • Copper Amino Acid Chelate
  • Beta Carotene
  • Zinc Oxide
  • Manganese Amino Acid Chelate
  • Iodine Amino Acid Chelate
  • Niacinamide
  • d-Calcium Pantothenate
  • Cholecalciferol
  • Chromium Amino Acid Chelate
  • Niacin
  • Molybdenum Amino Acid Chelate
  • Pyridoxine Hydrochloride
  • Cyanocobalamin
  • Riboflavin
  • Thiamin Hydrochloride
  • Folic Acid

Science behind Isagenix

When it comes to the science behind Isagenix, it is sort of hard to determine what exactly the brand is basing their recipes and claims on. There is a link on the homepage that refers to their science review board, which is supposed to have approved all of the Isagenix products, but the link doesn’t go anywhere, which may simply be a website problem, or it could be a problem with the actual review board itself.

The shakes themselves aren’t based on any real science, except the science of calorie reduction equals weight loss. There is some nutritional benefit to drinking them and they would give you a little more energy than the average meal that had the same caloric value, but other than that, you can’t really say that Isagenix has a basis in science.

What Results People Get – Isagenix Reviews

One of the good things that this product has going for it is that there are some isagenix reviews on the website that may be legitimate. The only thing that stands out is that all of the reviewers use their first and last name, which seems a little unlikely, and all of the reviews are either 4 stars or 5 stars.

However, there are quite a few reviews on Isagenix around the internet if you look for them. Some of them are written reviews that are obviously on fitness blogs, but many of them are videos that you can find on YouTube.

These two things together seem to indicate that quite a few people actually have had success with Isagenix. However, a review by the Sydney Morning Herald had a pretty good point: Isagenix doesn’t work because it has some special ingredient or secret that makes you lose weight; it works because you eat fewer calories than you are burning, the basis of all weight loss science, and with a nearly $500 price tag to start the program you will not be tempted to let It go easily.

isagenix reviewsSide Effects

Because you are eating fewer calories than you should be, this weight loss product does have some side effects; namely, that you will be irritable and hungry, and you may not have the energy to work out or do anything that you normally would. The list of ingredients is also quite disconcerting. Generally, when it comes to weight loss supplements and the like, the fewer ingredients that are in the supplement the better. This one has around five times more ingredients than most of the supplements and shakes out there, even when you compare them to the big companies like Shakeology and Nutrisystem.

Value & Pricing

The pricing is definitely not great on these shakes. A 14-serving can of Isagenix will run you over $50. That means that you break that price down down to a cost per shake, you are paying nearly four dollars for each one. You can get meal replacement shakes at the store for a lot less than that, and you can even get shakes from some of Isagenix’s competitors that cost less than that.

If you plan to do 2 shakes a day, which is the recommended diet plan that Isagenix lists in their literature, you would be spending over $207 a month for your shakes. This isn’t a great price and it is likely a great deal more than 2/3 of your grocery bill for a single person, which is what you’re getting with two shakes a day.

Conclusion

The question is, can we recommend Isagenix in good faith? Unfortunately, no; this product suffers from some pretty significant problems. First, there doesn’t seem to be any real basis in science for the shake itself, and the weight loss that people are experiencing is due to the simple principle of eating less calories than you are burning, something that will happen no matter how you get your calories.

In addition, the list of ingredients is really long and intimidating. The closer to nature that you can get with meal replacement shakes, the better off you’ll be. Finally, the price of Isagenix is just too high for what you are getting with your money.

Today, we’re going to be looking at another meal replacement product that is on the market – Isagenix. The name is pretty well known, and you may have heard of Isagenix before now. Isagenix is a nutritional cleanse and health products company that sells meal replacement bars, shakes and more. The program is designed primarily as a cleanse. A cleanse is probably not the best idea for a long-term weight loss plan, but it can certainly be useful in the short term. Of course, with any weight loss program, there is more here than meets the eye. Whether that is…

Isagenix Rating

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